Aidan Tulloch
Somewhere Without Lights
Independent

Aidan Tulloch has released his ep, Somewhere Without Light, and he has provided us with a catchy, bouncy collection of songs that recall some of the finer points of the 80s from The Smiths to Erasure.  It is a collection of songs based upon his background growing up in a gritty scene in Yorkshire, England, but he brings an impressive maturity to the music, which is all the more impressive upon realizing he is all of 20 years old.

He brings classical training to his music, perhaps most notably seen in the first track, ‘Milk and Orange Juice,’ which looks back to a cathartic night out.  It’s on this track that he announces both his intentions and his influences.  ‘Goalposts’ draws on the long history of alternative, or as it’s called now, indie rock, and brings to mind some of Jonny Marr’s best work with the Smiths, as Tulloch looks back on those endless teenage nights.

‘Song for Armageddon’ sounds like an anthem for our times, beginning with a sad trumpet before exploding into an Erasure-esque synthesizer spectacular as the jangly Johnny Marr guitar creeps in.  Tulloch’s voice betrays his North Yorkshire background, his accent is strong, which adds to his charm, and his actual voice bounces through a track that ponders, well, that familiar feeling of it all crashing down around us.  But Tulloch is too clever to crash down with everything, offering instead a blueprint as to how to get through Armageddon.  The towering synth riff is just so bloody catchy.

The ep closer is the title track, ‘Somewhere Without Lights,’ which opens with a soft piano, this is the calm after the storm, that feeling of that warm summer night, the viciousness of the daytime heat faded.  This is the lights coming on above us, on the patio, or the light of the moon in the field, it is lying back, with your arms as your pillow, or your lover’s arms doing the same.  It is lying on the hood of the car looking up at the stars.

Aidan Tulloch has created a beautiful, striking, and emotive ep here, and I am curious to see what comes next for such an obviously talented artist.